Behind the Scenes

New Project: Conversational Python

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As I’m trying to learn Python, I try to go to coding Meetups and other events. When I go, however, I’m hit with so many things that I don’t understand that people are discussing so casually. It makes me feel like I’ll never get there. Meanwhile, the coding books and tutorials move so slowly and helpfully through the fundamentals that I fear the two will never meet up.
For that reason, I’m making a point of writing down and looking into any concept that I don’t get. The plan is to build an e-learning module to go along with a code-learning plan, but it’s also for me.

My first real attempt was today. I listened to the first half of Talk Python to Me Ep. #153 with Nick Coghlan. Every time I started to get lost, I paused the feed and wrote down what I didn’t understand. Often phonetically.

The following partial glossary is just from the first half of the podcast. Maybe I will get to the rest tomorrow.

My messy notes

PEP: Python Enhancement Protocol

wire protocol structure using destruct(?) module to construct messages to send them back and forth.

ordinary squelchers don’t work in HF. Have to do signal analysis to detect voice.
Squelcher: An electric circuit that cuts off a radio receiver when the signal is too weak for reception of anything but noise.

C Programming for the DSP but we didn’t have a proper test harness; just a C application
DSP: Digital Signal Processing

next level of integration testing

control and orchestration language

Python unit test module

I-fall(?) [extreme programming; test driven development]

It’s Dave Beazley’s fault… SWIG existed. C++ driver ran on host. Used to talk to DSPs.
SWIG: a tool for building C/C++ extensions to Python.

Wrote one .i file for SWIG to wrap the production driver

Can express more simply in Python code than in production code. Tests in Python express your intent, then it doesn’t matter what your production code is.

Open source supply chain managment

Anything it didn’t do, I just added a library. Doing a lot with CORBA distributed communication protocol.

request brokers: In distributed computing, an object request broker (ORB) is a middleware which allows program calls to be made from one computer to another via a computer network, providing location transparency through remote procedure calls.

Used for test automation, hardware simulators, web app dev dating from the CGI days – which is actually how we wrote the original distributed system orchestration. Which you now mostly see in things like Ansible and Salt and Python wrappers around Docker and Kubernetes.

Micro controller code where your Python program almost is the operating system – wire your lambda expressions directly to hardware interrupts.

Origins in ABC research language (to teach people to think computationally). Base layer of imperative procedural programming (how humans think; doesn’t scale)

privileged access

interpreter can do things that ordinary python code can’t.

syntactic sugar – make sure there’s a procedural equivalent

Web frameworks, gui libraries, scientific stacks

Ansible: Python had been part of Linux distributions almost from the beginning. So sys admins started doing admin scripting.

Procedural model; move to declarative model further up the stack

random forest

deep learning

sql alchemy (watch talks about its design)

In computer architecture, cache coherence is the uniformity of shared resource data that ends up stored in multiple local caches.

Tcl/Tk: Tcl is the short form for ‘Tool Command Language’ and Tcl Tk is the term used for referring to the toolkit available for this programming language.

GNOME: a desktop environment composed of free and open-source software that runs on Linux and most BSD derivatives

AIX (Advanced Interactive eXecutive, pronounced /ˌeɪaɪˈɛks/[3]) is a series of proprietary Unix operating systems developed and sold by IBM for several of its computer platforms.

PIP

Sourceforge

IDLE (in standard library)

QT as a C++ wrapper tried to use native widgets when it could

GTK emerging as way Linux distros would do desktop

Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) is a C++ object-oriented library for developing desktop applications for Windows.

WX Python, WX Widgets, PY QT

Unresolved fight between QT and GTK on Linux

GTK’s efforts to support anything cross-platform isn’t really a thing. Linux/Unix equivalent of Win32 API. Not really cross-platform because it doesn’t delegate to platform-native stuff when you’re running someplace other than Linux. And that (native widgets) is what it takes to make your app look like it belongs.

(tuned out for a bit here)

Android on Dalvik layer (of Linux)… Java Runtime?

Electron JS, Cordova, Ionic, all the other frameworks

Phoenix Project, WX Python 4.0.

(halfway through at this point and enough to be going on with)